iGCSE Geography

iGCSE Geography

This course highlights the critical importance of geography for understanding the world and for stimulating an interest in places.

It will inspire students to become global citizens by exploring their place in the world and their values as well as their responsibilities to other people and to the environment. The content focuses on current issues designed to inspire and motivate students to study geography.

A modern and engaging approach covers key ideas and debates such as climate change, globalisation, economic progress, urban regeneration and management of world resources. The focus of this course is an understanding of the dynamic nature of physical and human processes, and of how the physical/human interface needs to be managed in order to ensure human and environmental sustainability.

Students will learn to appreciate the differences and similarities between people, places and cultures, leading to an improved understanding of societies and economies. The Level 1/2 Certificate offers a choice of physical and human geographical issues such as globalisation, population and climate change that have a profound impact on today’s world and the lives of students.

This course will aim to do the following:

  • Offer students some freedom of choice – choosing to study two from four possible options in papers 1 and 2 (Physical Geography and Human Geography)
  • It is assessed through written examinations only, so there’s no need for coursework or controlled assessments
  • Offer an opportunity for students to develop the independent learning skills they need to flourish in higher education

 

Course Content

The specification we follow is Level 1/2 Certificate (IGCSE Geography). The following content can be undertaken as a one or two-year course depending on the type of course being taken at Bosworth.

  • A balanced understanding of physical, human and environmental geography
  • A thematic approach to the subject, with an emphasis on contemporary issues and future changes
  • A choice of options which focus on the relationships between people and the environment
  • A clear and manageable case study requirement
  • A study of the challenges and constraints affecting people in different places
  • An understanding of the significance and effects of the different ways in which decisions are made about the use and management of resources
  • A decision-making exercise based on pre-released sources
  • The use of geographical study to develop a wide range of skills
  • The use of modern information technologies, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as appropriate to the content
  • An enquiry-based approach to learning

This is a linear qualification with the assessment of all three units taking place at the end of the course. There are three written papers. Paper 1 assesses Physical Geography and Paper 2 assesses Human Geography. Paper 3 is based on a theme which will arise from the subject content of units 1 and 2 but may extend beyond it through the use of resources.

Alternative study: GCSE History and A-level Geography

Assessment

Paper 1: Dynamic Physical World

Candidates answer questions on two from four options:
Tectonic Activity and Hazards Ecosystems and Global Environments
River Processes and Pressures
Coastal Processes and Pressures

Questions will be a mix of short, structured responses and the opportunity for extended writing.
 
Paper 1: Lasts one hour and forms 30% of the whole GCSE assessment.

Paper 2: Global Human Issues

Candidates answer questions on two from four options:
Contemporary Population Issues Contemporary Issues in Urban Settlements
Globalisation in the Contemporary World
Contemporary Issues in Tourism

Questions will be a mix of short, structured responses and the opportunity for extended writing.
 
Paper 2: Lasts one hour and forms 30% of the whole GCSE assessment.

Paper 3: Application of Geographical Skills and Decision Making
Section A – Application of Geographical Skills (35 marks) 20% of the assessment. Compulsory structured questions based on resources.  
Section B – Geographical Decision Making (35 marks) 20% of the assessment.
 
Compulsory structured questions on a theme – leading up to an extended writing task based on a pre-release Sources Booklet – to be issued to students in advance.
A theme outline will be issued in April, two years in advance of the examination.
The theme will arise from the subject content of units 1 or 2 but may extend beyond it through the use of the resources.
The theme could combine human and physical aspects.  
 
Paper 3: Lasts one hour and 30 minutes and forms 40% of the whole GCSE assessment.

Where does it lead?

Geography is very versatile, developing skills that are relevant in a number of different careers or Higher Education courses, such as: interpretation, communication, becoming an effective and independent learner and a critical and reflective thinker with an enquiring mind.

To gain knowledge and understanding of geographical concepts relevant to a changing world and to be able to take responsibility as a global citizen who can recognise how individuals can contribute to a sustainable future is invaluable.

Students of geography might go on to study for university degrees in that subject – or a range of other subjects including: history, sociology, psychology, English and law. Geography is a subject that can support careers in the above areas as well as teaching, logistics, business & finance, journalism, publishing and politics.

Employers view geography as an ideal topic of study and one that develops essential and transferable skills. Indeed a recent survey showed that geography graduates are behind only law and sports sciences in their employability, due to the wide range of transferable skills they have.

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